“Bebe” Davis Withdraws Feivel Mouskewitz from Hagen Young Rider Nations Cup, Borrows Horse to Remain on USA Team

4 years ago admin Comments Off on “Bebe” Davis Withdraws Feivel Mouskewitz from Hagen Young Rider Nations Cup, Borrows Horse to Remain on USA Team
Barbara "Bebe" Davis on Feivel Mouskewitz competing at Compiègne, France last month. 2016 Lily Forado for dressage-news.com
Barbara “Bebe” Davis on Feivel Mouskewitz competing at Compiègne, France last month. 2016 Lily Forado for dressage-news.com

HAGEN, Germany, June 7, 2016–Barbara “Bebe” Davis has withdrawn her Feivel Mouskewitz on which she is ranked No. 4 Young Rider in the world from the Future Champions Nations Cup in Germany this week but borrowed a horse to compete on the United States team with Lauren Asher and Kerrigan Gluch.

Bebe will ride Don Antonio, a 12-year-old Hanoverian gelding that was shown at CDI Small Tour earlier this year, in the premier Young Rider Nations Cup in which eight teams are scheduled to compete at Hagen, Germany.

The horse was loaned to her by Jochen Arl, a Belgium-based horse dealer, after Bebe of Wellington, Florida withdrew Feivel Mouskewitz that was still foot sore after competing at Compiègne, France last month.

“Getting to compete in Hagen has been my goal since the beginning so it’s great being able to achieve that goal even under different circumstances,” said the 18-year-old of Wellington, Florida who was the top ranked qualifier with Feivel Mousekewitz for the European tour. She won North American Junior Rider Championships team gold on “Mouse” in 2014.

Lauren Asher, based in San Diego, California will compete her De Noir and Kerrigan Gluch will show Vaquero HGF that is owned by Hampton Green Farm in Wellington where she is based.

Hagen’s Future Champions event provides for teams of up to three combinations with two scores counting as distinct from senior Nations Cups that typically enable teams of four with three scores counting.

The United States entered a team of two combinations at Hagen for the first time last year as part of a program massively expanding American participation in European shows since six-time Olympian Robert Dover became leader of U.S. dressage as official technical advisor and chef d’equipe and spearheaded major fund-raising drives. Like all sports in the United States, equestrian teams receive no taxpayer funding but depend on contributions from individuals and corporations as well as support from membership organizations such as the U.S. Equestrian Federation.