Janne Rumbough at Age 69 Rides Junior at CDI Grand Prix After Moving Through Every US Training Level

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Janne Rumbough on Junior, a horse she bred, after competing in the World Cup Grand Prix to complete progression through all the United States training levels. © 2013 Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com  through Aerica
Janne Rumbough on Junior, a horse she bred, after competing in the World Cup Grand Prix to complete progression through all the United States training levels. © 2013 Ken Braddick/dressage-news.com through Aerica

LOXAHATCHEE, Florida, Mar. 22–Janne Rumbough decided when Junior was born to her stallion Gaucho, that she would compete the P.R.E. foal through every level of the American training scale to see how well it worked.

On Friday, the 69-year-old Danish-born Adult Amateur completed the journey by riding the 17-hand (172cm) dapple gray in the World Cup Grand Prix at the I.H.S. Champions Cup for sixth place on a score of 63.362 per cent.

Janne is based out of her MTICA Farm in Wellington and coached by Florida-based Dane Mikala Gundersen.

Junior is a 10-year-old gelding (Gaucho III x La Nina III x Brioso VI).

The pair trained at the U.S. national levels of Training through Fourth Level, not advancing to the next level until achieving the score required at each level. The combination began international small tour 14 months ago and fulfilled her goal at the CDI-W.

Janne was riding ponies six decades ago in Copenhagen. She came to the United States first at the age of 22 to further her education. She became a citizen 16 years ago.

She moved to Florida in 1975 when there were no dressage competitions and helped build the circuit that is now one of the most concentrated in the world with 11 CDIs over a period of three months in winter. In addition to competing, she remains a sponsor of events.

With Junior, “I wanted to do the American system of going through every single level,” she told dressage-news.com. “I wanted to hurry up slowly, to get there without a struggle. It worked.

“I’ve been doing this for more than 60 years. I should be good at it by now,” she joked.